Recommended Tackle & Gear

It’s important to have the right gear when you’re fishing at Jurassic Lake Lodge. It can make the difference in your trip. So, what should you bring? Here’s what we recommend:

 
 
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Single Hand RODs

We recommend 9 to 10 ft. single handed rods in the 7 or 8 weight category. For the tributary river you may want a single-handed 9ft in the 4 or 5 weight rod. It makes sense to bring a back-up rod as well.

 

 
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Two handed rods

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FLIES

 
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PRINCE

Developed by Doug Prince around the thirties and in the past fifteen years or so has become a 'go-to' pattern for many anglers across the world. The addition of a brass or tungsten bead has made this fly even more effective.

Sizes: #14 - 18

 
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Wooly Bugger

For sure the most recognizable, and likely the most commonly fished streamer fly ever tied. The wooly bugger attracts fish in fast or slow water, rivers, ponds, and lakes. This streamer fly pattern is a classic that you simply can't be without.

Sizes: #6 - 8 / Colors: White, Black, Olive.

 
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CHERNOBYL ( ANT & HOOPER )

High floating fly is virtually unsinkable and very easy to see on the water. The Chernobyl's variations are great patterns that works really good on our waters.

Size: #8

 
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ROYAL WULFF

First tied by Lee Wulff and fished with great success for decades. This buggy dry fly imitates many different types of mayflies and terrestrials, too. A great dry fly for prospecting, it can be fished in slow or fast water.

Size: #18

 

 
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BEAD HEAD SUCKING LEECH

Originally designed for fly fishing king salmon in Alaska, this pattern is a mixe the body of a wooly bugger leech with an egg pattern tied in to the head, a combination of two favorite fares of Jurassic Lake Lodge's trouts.